Most golf bags have a ring to which a player can tie or clip a golf towel, used to wipe hands and clean or dry balls and club faces. Some of these towels can be quite specialized, with a carabiner or other clip to attach it to the bag with a grommet used on the towel for durability, and incorporating rougher materials in certain sections of the towel for club and ball cleaning with softer weaves elsewhere for drying. Other cleaning products abound, from motorized ball cleaners to an array of brushes for various types of clubs as well as balls and shoes.

A tee is an object (wooden or plastic) that is pushed into or placed on the ground to rest a ball on top of for an easier shot; however, this is only allowed for the first stroke (tee shot or drive) of each hole. Conventional golf tees are basically spikes with a small cup on the head to hold the ball, and are usually made of wood or plastic. Wooden tees are generally very inexpensive and quite disposable; a player may damage or break many of these during the course of a round. Plastic tees are generally more expensive but last longer. The length of tees varies according to the club intended to be used and by personal preference; longer tees (3-3.5") allow the player to position the ball higher off the ground while remaining stable when planted, and are generally used for modern deep-faced woods. They can be planted deeper for use with other clubs but then tend to break more often. Shorter tees (1.5-2.5") are suitable for irons and are more easily inserted and less easily broken than long tees. Other designs of tee exist; the "step tee" is milled or molded with a spool-shaped upper half, and so generally provides a consistent ball height from shot to shot. The "brush tee" uses a collection of stiff bristles instead of a cup to position the ball; the design is touted by its manufacturer as providing less interference to the ball or club at impact, for a straighter, longer flight.

Golf carts are vehicles used to transport golf bags and golfers along the golf course during a round of golf. Hand carts are designed to hold only the bag, and are used by players while walking along the course to relieve them of the weight of the bag. Carts that carry both player and bag are more common on public golf courses; most of these are powered by a battery and electric motors, though gasoline-powered carts are sometimes used by course staff, and some courses and players are beginning to explore alternatives such as bicycle-drawn carts.


2nd Swing Golf offers unbeatable selection on the gambit of golf clubs for sale. From top of line new product to decades old putters, 2nd Swing is your one-stop golf equipment shop. We take pride in having the best & largest selection of golf clubs anywhere and we'll make sure you are well-equipped for your next round. The way we see it, there is no club fits all. Our approach is individualized.  Give us a call, send an email, or chat with us.  We'll work with you in making a tailor-made purchase so there is no question the golf club that arrives at your door is right for you.  That's why we don't just list a model! We show you the club with several actual photos and detailed notes so there are no surprises. What you see is what you get. Noone else can say that.
Golfers also often wear gloves that help grip the club and prevent blistering. Gloves are sold individually and normally worn only on the players' non-dominant hand, but it is not unheard-of for a player to wear gloves on both hands to reduce chafing. The increased grip and control allows for harder swings to be made with more control, increasing distance.

Men who are just starting to golf should check out the 16-piece PRE Men’s golf set from Pinemeadow. In addition to a great stand bag with a kickstand and carrying straps, this set will give guys all the tools they need to start their golf games. Including a 10.5-degree titanium driver, a 3-wood and a 3-hybrid as well as irons 4 through 9, a pitching wedge and a putter, this set will allow new golfers to quickly play a whole 18 with the guys. Reviewers, who rate this set highly, repeatedly note how simple and effective these clubs are and that they are well worth the low price.

Sunday bags are commonly advertised as "minimalist" carry bags; they have very light weight and flexible construction allowing the bag to be rolled up or folded for storage without clubs, and have storage pockets for the essentials of play (clubs, balls, tees) but often lack more advanced features like segregated club storage, insulated pockets for drinks, stand legs etc.

When deciding on a club set, consider the amount of pieces you want. If you are brand new to golf, you may want to look at set that has a 15 pieces or less. That way the game won't get too complicated. If you've been playing a while and just want to get a full set of clubs that match, then certainly go with a 16-piece set or more. Keep in mind, "pieces" do not mean clubs. "Pieces" refers to the actual number of items included—the golf bag and headcovers themselves count as "pieces".


Golf club sets are a great and easy way to get started in the sport of golf. Most golf sets will come complete with nearly everything you need to hit the course right away. Golf club sets offer a full complement of clubs including a driver, one or more fairway woods, one or more hybrids, an iron set, and a putter. All golf sets include a golf bag to carry all those clubs, and most will also include headcovers for the woods to protect the clubheads.
Golf drivers help you achieve distance and flight off the tee. You can select from standard, midsize and oversized clubheads and a variety of materials, from innovative titanium to popular aluminum. Today’s larger clubfaces have larger sweet spots and promote greater stability and power on impact. In addition, drivers come in many lofts, typically between 8 and 15 degrees for men and 10 and 15 degrees for women.
Positional guides encompass a wide variety of devices meant to improve a player's stance or swing. Lasers attach to the shaft of a putter and project a "putting line" onto the ground. Specialized tapes attach to the clubhead and provide clues as to how the head is hitting the ground or the ball for future correction or club adjustment. These are also illegal in tournament play, but are invaluable while practicing.
Originally, golf balls were made of a hardwood, such as beech. Beginning between the 14th and 16th centuries, more expensive golf balls were made of a leather skin stuffed with down feathers; these were called "featheries". Around the mid-1800s, a new material called gutta-percha, made from the latex of the East Asian sapodilla tree, started to be used to create more inexpensive golf balls nicknamed "gutties", which had similar flight characteristics as featheries. These then progressed to "brambles" in the later 1800s, using a raised dimple pattern and resembling bramble fruit, and then to "meshies" beginning in the early 1900s, where ball manufacturers started experimenting with latex rubber cores and wound mesh skins that created recessed patterns over the ball's surface. Recessed circular dimples were patented in 1910, but didn't become popular until the 1940s after the patents expired.
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