Spikes on most golf shoes are replaceable, being attached using one of two common methods: a thread or a twist lock. Two sizes of thread are in common use, called a "large thread" and "small thread". There are two common locking systems: Q-LOK and Tri-LOK (also called "Fast Twist"). The locking systems use a plastic thread which takes only about a half turn to lock.[1]
Staff bags are the largest class of golf bags, and are generally seen carried by caddies or other assistants to professional or high-level amateur players. Staff bags are generally the same size or larger than a cart bag, and typically feature a single shoulder strap, a large amount of storage for equipment and even spare attire, and large logo branding designed for product placement on televised events.
GolfDiscount.com is proud to offer our wide selection of golf clubs at the lowest possible prices. Featuring the latest in booming driver technology, fairway woods with full custom adjustability, as well as versatile hybrids that bring distance and forgiveness from every lie on the course. We also carry hundreds of iron sets in a wide variety of specifications, making it easier than ever to find the right lie angle, set composition, and performance characteristics to help you land greens and score lower. In the short game department, GolfDiscount.com stocks wedges of all lofts and bounce angles, including custom grinds and unique finishes to help you stay sharp around the green, while a vast array of putters in all lengths and head shapes ensure you'll find the right flat stick that suits your eye and rolls true. For beginning golfers, or one-stop shoppers, we also carry a large sampling of complete sets, beginner sets and junior clubs, providing players of all skill levels all they need to hit the course right out of the box.
Sunday bags are commonly advertised as "minimalist" carry bags; they have very light weight and flexible construction allowing the bag to be rolled up or folded for storage without clubs, and have storage pockets for the essentials of play (clubs, balls, tees) but often lack more advanced features like segregated club storage, insulated pockets for drinks, stand legs etc.
Stroke counters help a player keep track of the number of strokes he or she has made during a hole, an entire round, or both. The simplest devices are strings of beads, thumbwheels or "clickers" that a player advances by one after each stroke and provide a total for the player to write on their scorecard after each hole; newer variations have various degrees of computational power added and can keep score for multiple holes, total scores, and keep track of over/under par statistics. These more advanced counters are generally referred to as "electronic scorecards". Counters by themselves are allowed under strict rules, but some multi-functional devices incorporate additional banned features like rangefinders or wind gauges, and as such the entire device becomes illegal.
GolfDiscount.com is proud to offer our wide selection of golf clubs at the lowest possible prices. Featuring the latest in booming driver technology, fairway woods with full custom adjustability, as well as versatile hybrids that bring distance and forgiveness from every lie on the course. We also carry hundreds of iron sets in a wide variety of specifications, making it easier than ever to find the right lie angle, set composition, and performance characteristics to help you land greens and score lower. In the short game department, GolfDiscount.com stocks wedges of all lofts and bounce angles, including custom grinds and unique finishes to help you stay sharp around the green, while a vast array of putters in all lengths and head shapes ensure you'll find the right flat stick that suits your eye and rolls true. For beginning golfers, or one-stop shoppers, we also carry a large sampling of complete sets, beginner sets and junior clubs, providing players of all skill levels all they need to hit the course right out of the box.

Each of these golf club sets for sale comes in a different-style bag and club head, making it easier to keep track of your equipment when out on the green. Most also include a stand bag for propping up your golf club set at an angle, and some even include head covers to help ensure your golf clubs' heads stay shiny and protected from the elements when not in use. For younger golfers, explore our selection of junior clubs, and start them off right with a solid set of beginner's golf equipment. These clubs can help start a lifelong love for the game.
Head out to the golf course with everything you need when you get a high-quality set of golf clubs found in this selection. These women's and men's golf club sets help ensure you have each club you need to play a successful golf game, saving time and money. Whether you're a first-time player or a seasoned veteran, you can find the right set of clubs for your game in this assortment. Look through our entire selection of golf clubs to find replacement clubs and other accessories that can help enhance your game.

Shop with confidence as we offer a price match guarantee that applies after your purchase. All orders shipping within the US over $99 include Free Shipping and convenient order tracking. With over 40 years in the golf industry and 5 retail locations we have built strong relationship with all the top golf brands. This history provides us exclusive opportunites such as first access and closeout buys allowing us to pass the discount along.
The use of carts may be restricted by local rules. Courses may institute rules such as "90 degree paths", where drivers must stay on the cart path until level with their ball, and then may turn onto the course. This typically reduces the effect that the furrows from the cart wheels will have on balls. Soft ground due to rain or recent maintenance work may require a "cart path only" driving rule to protect the turf, and a similar policy may apply in general to the areas around tee boxes and greens (and on shorter par-3 holes where fairway shots are not expected). The use of carts is banned altogether at most major PGA tournaments; players walk the course assisted by a caddy who carries equipment.
The minimum allowed diameter of a golf ball is 42.67 mm and its mass may not exceed 45.93 g. Modern golf balls have a two-, three-, or four-layer design constructed from various synthetic materials. The surface usually has a pattern of 300-450 dimples designed to improve the ball's aerodynamics by reducing the ball's drag-inducing wake and allowing spin on the ball to create lift. The method of construction and materials used greatly affect the ball's playing characteristics such as distance, trajectory, spin and feel. Harder materials, such as Surlyn, usually result in the ball's traveling longer distances, while softer covers, such as urethane, tend to generate higher spin, more "feel" and greater stopping potential. Golf balls are separated into three groups depending on their construction: two-, three-, or four-piece covers. Generally four-piece golf balls tend to be the most expensive, though price is no assurance of quality.
Stroke counters help a player keep track of the number of strokes he or she has made during a hole, an entire round, or both. The simplest devices are strings of beads, thumbwheels or "clickers" that a player advances by one after each stroke and provide a total for the player to write on their scorecard after each hole; newer variations have various degrees of computational power added and can keep score for multiple holes, total scores, and keep track of over/under par statistics. These more advanced counters are generally referred to as "electronic scorecards". Counters by themselves are allowed under strict rules, but some multi-functional devices incorporate additional banned features like rangefinders or wind gauges, and as such the entire device becomes illegal.
The traditional way to play was to walk, but the use of golf carts is very common due to a number of factors. Chief among them is the sheer length of the modern course, and the required "pace of play" instituted by many courses to prevent delays for other golfers and maintain a schedule of tee times. A typical par-72 course would "measure out" at between 6,000 and 7,000 total yards, which does not count the distance between the green of one hole and the tee of the next, nor the additional distance caused by errant shots. A player walking a 7,000-yard course might traverse up to 5 miles (8km). With a typical required pace of play of 4 hours, a player would spend 1.6 hours of that time simply walking to their next shot, leaving an average of only two minutes for all players to make each of the 72 shots for a par score (and most casual players do not score the course par). Economics is another reason why carts have become prevalent at many courses; the fee for renting a cart is less expensive than paying a caddie to carry the bags, and the private club gets the money for the cart rentals. A golf cart also enables physically handicapped people to play the game. Carts are also popular with golfers who are too lazy to walk the course.

The use of carts may be restricted by local rules. Courses may institute rules such as "90 degree paths", where drivers must stay on the cart path until level with their ball, and then may turn onto the course. This typically reduces the effect that the furrows from the cart wheels will have on balls. Soft ground due to rain or recent maintenance work may require a "cart path only" driving rule to protect the turf, and a similar policy may apply in general to the areas around tee boxes and greens (and on shorter par-3 holes where fairway shots are not expected). The use of carts is banned altogether at most major PGA tournaments; players walk the course assisted by a caddy who carries equipment.


Stroke counters help a player keep track of the number of strokes he or she has made during a hole, an entire round, or both. The simplest devices are strings of beads, thumbwheels or "clickers" that a player advances by one after each stroke and provide a total for the player to write on their scorecard after each hole; newer variations have various degrees of computational power added and can keep score for multiple holes, total scores, and keep track of over/under par statistics. These more advanced counters are generally referred to as "electronic scorecards". Counters by themselves are allowed under strict rules, but some multi-functional devices incorporate additional banned features like rangefinders or wind gauges, and as such the entire device becomes illegal.
As an authorized internet retailer of all major golf club manufacturers, we carry new, best selling & closeout clubs from the top-brands. Whether you're looking for the latest driver, fairway wood, hybrids or you're searching for closeout irons and a used putter, we've got you covered. Our women's and junior section feature golf clubs from every category including best selling complete sets from Callaway and Cobra. We offer men's golf clubs at discount prices from brands like Ping, Titleist, Callaway, TaylorMade and more. All golf clubs include a 30 day return policy, *free shipping and a low price guarantee, allowing you to shop with complete confidence at Golf Discount.com *PING Golf Clubs are excluded from free shipping offer

Rangefinders allow a golfer to measure exact distance to the hole from their current position; they are illegal according to Rule 14-3 of the rules of golf, but the USGA allows individual course clubs to institute a local rule permitting rangefinders, and they are common among recreational golfers. The typical rangefinder is an optical device that is aimed by sighting the scope on the flag and using the calibrated gauge in the optics to estimate the distance based on the flagstick's apparent height. Other rangefinders estimate range using a calibrated focus or parallax control; the user sights the target, brings it into focus, and reads the distance mark on the control. Newer laser rangefinders operate by simply sighting any target and pressing a switch to take a very precise distance reading using an invisible laser. Newer golf carts often include GPS tracking which, combined with an electronic map of the course, can serve a similar function.

A player usually carries several clubs during the game (but no more than fourteen, the limit defined by the rules). There are three major types of clubs, known as woods, irons, and putters. Woods are played for long shots from the tee or fairway, and occasionally rough, while irons are for precision shots from fairways as well as from the rough. Wedges are irons used to play shorter shots. A new type of club called a hybrid combines the straight-hitting characteristics of irons with the easy-to-hit characteristics of higher-lofted woods. A hybrid is often used for long shots from difficult rough. Hybrids are also used by players who have a difficult time getting the ball airborne with long irons. Wedges are played from difficult ground such as sand or the rough and for approach shots to the green. Putters are mostly played on the green, but can also be useful when playing from bunkers or for some approach shots. Putters have minimal loft, forcing the ball to stay on the putting surface when struck. The most common clubs to find in a golfer's bag are the driver, 3-wood, numbered irons from 3 to 9 (with hybrids commonly replacing the 3 and 4 iron), pitching and sand wedges, and a putter. Players commonly also carry a 5-wood, and/or additional wedges such as a gap or lob wedge.
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