Ball retrievers are telescoping poles with a device at the end that scoops up and traps golf balls, and are used for reclaiming a ball from a water hazard. These are allowed under strict rules (provided of course the proper one-stroke penalty is assessed for hitting the ball into the water in the first place), but for courtesy to other players a player retrieving his ball should do so quickly, and should not spend time retrieving abandoned balls.
The set is specifically geared to beginners. Although it may not have the versatility that more experienced golfers want, the Ultra set delivers a great return on investment and can last for a long time. Amazon reviewers consistently compliment the clubs on their durability in beginner's hands and how you can’t get a better full set of clubs for the price.
Spikes on most golf shoes are replaceable, being attached using one of two common methods: a thread or a twist lock. Two sizes of thread are in common use, called a "large thread" and "small thread". There are two common locking systems: Q-LOK and Tri-LOK (also called "Fast Twist"). The locking systems use a plastic thread which takes only about a half turn to lock.[1]
Golf Galaxy is your destination for expert golf club repair. Extend the life of your clubs with essential services, everything from regripping to shaft replacement. You can also trade in your golf clubs for Golf Galaxy gift cards, or shop our large selection of gently used golf clubs from top brands-each club is cleaned, inspected and graded on condition.
Casual golfers can choose from our many beginner sets, featuring a full set of clubs and all the bells and whistles you'll need to get out on the course and start learning the game. More experienced golfers looking to save some money, or perhaps looking to upgrade an older set after some time away from golf, will be best suited with one of our more premium complete sets, loaded with high-end name brand equipment from driver to wedges, all in one simple and convenient purchase.
Consider the Tour Edge Golf HT Max Jr set for high-end, inexpensive stylish clubs for young kids. This set includes a 350cc titanium driver, some oversized steel irons and a simple mallet-style putter. This set is simple, small and well-made. It's a great option for parents and kids to play together or practice in the backyard. Tour Edge’s set even comes with a fun, bright red golf bag. 
GolfDiscount.com is proud to offer our wide selection of golf clubs at the lowest possible prices. Featuring the latest in booming driver technology, fairway woods with full custom adjustability, as well as versatile hybrids that bring distance and forgiveness from every lie on the course. We also carry hundreds of iron sets in a wide variety of specifications, making it easier than ever to find the right lie angle, set composition, and performance characteristics to help you land greens and score lower. In the short game department, GolfDiscount.com stocks wedges of all lofts and bounce angles, including custom grinds and unique finishes to help you stay sharp around the green, while a vast array of putters in all lengths and head shapes ensure you'll find the right flat stick that suits your eye and rolls true. For beginning golfers, or one-stop shoppers, we also carry a large sampling of complete sets, beginner sets and junior clubs, providing players of all skill levels all they need to hit the course right out of the box.
When on the green, the ball may be picked up to be cleaned or if it is in the way of an opponent's putting line; there are certain other circumstances in which a ball may be lifted. In these cases, the ball's position must first be marked using a ball marker; this is typically a round, flat piece of metal or plastic that is differentiable from others in use. Ball markers are often integrated into other accessories, such as divot tools, scorekeeping tools or tee holders, and in the absence of a purpose-made marker, a small coin such as a penny is acceptable.
Travel bags are available with many combinations of size and features, but are distinguished by rigid and/or heavily padded construction, including the clubhead cover (which on most other bags is simply an unpadded "rain fly"), and locks on the zippers and bag cover. These features protect the clubs from abuse and theft, and generally makes the bag suitable for checked airline luggage. Travel bags are generally used by amateur players that travel occasionally, such as business executives; rigid flight cases that enclose the actual golf bag are generally preferred by touring players, as these cases can enclose any golf bag, are more discreet as to their contents thus further deterring theft, and the case's weight and bulk can be left behind while on the course where it's not needed.
You are eligible for a full refund if no ShippingPass-eligible orders have been placed. You cannot receive a refund if you have placed a ShippingPass-eligible order. In this case, the Customer Care team will remove your account from auto-renewal to ensure you are not charged for an additional year and you can continue to use the subscription until the end of your subscription term.
When deciding on a club set, consider the amount of pieces you want. If you are brand new to golf, you may want to look at set that has a 15 pieces or less. That way the game won't get too complicated. If you've been playing a while and just want to get a full set of clubs that match, then certainly go with a 16-piece set or more. Keep in mind, "pieces" do not mean clubs. "Pieces" refers to the actual number of items included—the golf bag and headcovers themselves count as "pieces".
Originally, golf balls were made of a hardwood, such as beech. Beginning between the 14th and 16th centuries, more expensive golf balls were made of a leather skin stuffed with down feathers; these were called "featheries". Around the mid-1800s, a new material called gutta-percha, made from the latex of the East Asian sapodilla tree, started to be used to create more inexpensive golf balls nicknamed "gutties", which had similar flight characteristics as featheries. These then progressed to "brambles" in the later 1800s, using a raised dimple pattern and resembling bramble fruit, and then to "meshies" beginning in the early 1900s, where ball manufacturers started experimenting with latex rubber cores and wound mesh skins that created recessed patterns over the ball's surface. Recessed circular dimples were patented in 1910, but didn't become popular until the 1940s after the patents expired.
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