Ball retrievers are telescoping poles with a device at the end that scoops up and traps golf balls, and are used for reclaiming a ball from a water hazard. These are allowed under strict rules (provided of course the proper one-stroke penalty is assessed for hitting the ball into the water in the first place), but for courtesy to other players a player retrieving his ball should do so quickly, and should not spend time retrieving abandoned balls.


Casual golfers can choose from our many beginner sets, featuring a full set of clubs and all the bells and whistles you'll need to get out on the course and start learning the game. More experienced golfers looking to save some money, or perhaps looking to upgrade an older set after some time away from golf, will be best suited with one of our more premium complete sets, loaded with high-end name brand equipment from driver to wedges, all in one simple and convenient purchase.

GolfDiscount.com is proud to offer our wide selection of golf clubs at the lowest possible prices. Featuring the latest in booming driver technology, fairway woods with full custom adjustability, as well as versatile hybrids that bring distance and forgiveness from every lie on the course. We also carry hundreds of iron sets in a wide variety of specifications, making it easier than ever to find the right lie angle, set composition, and performance characteristics to help you land greens and score lower. In the short game department, GolfDiscount.com stocks wedges of all lofts and bounce angles, including custom grinds and unique finishes to help you stay sharp around the green, while a vast array of putters in all lengths and head shapes ensure you'll find the right flat stick that suits your eye and rolls true. For beginning golfers, or one-stop shoppers, we also carry a large sampling of complete sets, beginner sets and junior clubs, providing players of all skill levels all they need to hit the course right out of the box.


Customers get a 460cc driver, a 3-wood, a hybrid, irons 5 through 9 and a pitching wedge. This set does not have a putter but does include head coverings. Amazon reviewers comment on the high quality of these beginner clubs and how low the price point is. Users agree on the excellence of the Pinemeadow irons​ but disagree about how much they like the driver and woods.
Ball retrievers are telescoping poles with a device at the end that scoops up and traps golf balls, and are used for reclaiming a ball from a water hazard. These are allowed under strict rules (provided of course the proper one-stroke penalty is assessed for hitting the ball into the water in the first place), but for courtesy to other players a player retrieving his ball should do so quickly, and should not spend time retrieving abandoned balls.
When on the green, the ball may be picked up to be cleaned or if it is in the way of an opponent's putting line; there are certain other circumstances in which a ball may be lifted. In these cases, the ball's position must first be marked using a ball marker; this is typically a round, flat piece of metal or plastic that is differentiable from others in use. Ball markers are often integrated into other accessories, such as divot tools, scorekeeping tools or tee holders, and in the absence of a purpose-made marker, a small coin such as a penny is acceptable.
Golf clubs are made specifically based on the handedness of each person. Therefore, someone who shoots right-handed will not be able to use clubs designed for left-handed shooters as easily as they would be able to use a club built for their dominant hand. However, it may be possible for a golfer to change his or her stance to accommodate the desire or need to use a wedge, driver, or iron designed for their opposite hand.
In April 1998, TGW.com - The Golf Warehouse took its first order and became one of the world's first online golf stores. Based out of Wichita, Kansas, TGW began as The Golf Warehouse, a small family-operated business with only four full-time employees. The company has since grown to over 250 team members. During this growth, The Golf Warehouse has become TGW to reflect the transition from online golf store pioneer to industry leader. The name and look are updated, while maintaining the same great selection and service you trust. Now, with over 230,000 square feet of warehouse space devoted to over 40,000 golf products, TGW is the Sweetest Spot in Golf.
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Staff bags are the largest class of golf bags, and are generally seen carried by caddies or other assistants to professional or high-level amateur players. Staff bags are generally the same size or larger than a cart bag, and typically feature a single shoulder strap, a large amount of storage for equipment and even spare attire, and large logo branding designed for product placement on televised events.
Travel bags are available with many combinations of size and features, but are distinguished by rigid and/or heavily padded construction, including the clubhead cover (which on most other bags is simply an unpadded "rain fly"), and locks on the zippers and bag cover. These features protect the clubs from abuse and theft, and generally makes the bag suitable for checked airline luggage. Travel bags are generally used by amateur players that travel occasionally, such as business executives; rigid flight cases that enclose the actual golf bag are generally preferred by touring players, as these cases can enclose any golf bag, are more discreet as to their contents thus further deterring theft, and the case's weight and bulk can be left behind while on the course where it's not needed.
Golf Galaxy is your destination for expert golf club repair. Extend the life of your clubs with essential services, everything from regripping to shaft replacement. You can also trade in your golf clubs for Golf Galaxy gift cards, or shop our large selection of gently used golf clubs from top brands-each club is cleaned, inspected and graded on condition.
The use of carts may be restricted by local rules. Courses may institute rules such as "90 degree paths", where drivers must stay on the cart path until level with their ball, and then may turn onto the course. This typically reduces the effect that the furrows from the cart wheels will have on balls. Soft ground due to rain or recent maintenance work may require a "cart path only" driving rule to protect the turf, and a similar policy may apply in general to the areas around tee boxes and greens (and on shorter par-3 holes where fairway shots are not expected). The use of carts is banned altogether at most major PGA tournaments; players walk the course assisted by a caddy who carries equipment.
A player usually carries several clubs during the game (but no more than fourteen, the limit defined by the rules). There are three major types of clubs, known as woods, irons, and putters. Woods are played for long shots from the tee or fairway, and occasionally rough, while irons are for precision shots from fairways as well as from the rough. Wedges are irons used to play shorter shots. A new type of club called a hybrid combines the straight-hitting characteristics of irons with the easy-to-hit characteristics of higher-lofted woods. A hybrid is often used for long shots from difficult rough. Hybrids are also used by players who have a difficult time getting the ball airborne with long irons. Wedges are played from difficult ground such as sand or the rough and for approach shots to the green. Putters are mostly played on the green, but can also be useful when playing from bunkers or for some approach shots. Putters have minimal loft, forcing the ball to stay on the putting surface when struck. The most common clubs to find in a golfer's bag are the driver, 3-wood, numbered irons from 3 to 9 (with hybrids commonly replacing the 3 and 4 iron), pitching and sand wedges, and a putter. Players commonly also carry a 5-wood, and/or additional wedges such as a gap or lob wedge.
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