A ball mark repair tool (also known as a pitchfork or divot tool) is used to repair a ball mark (a depression in the green where a ball has hit the ground on its approach shot). Some tees contain such a tool at the end, for pure convenience when on the green. To repair a ball mark, one pushes the tool next to the mark and pushes gently inwards from all sides, loosening the compacted turf to allow rapid regrowth of grass, and then flattens the mark with the smooth flat bottom of the putter to smooth the putting surface.

Complete golf sets are perfect for beginners looking to get started or experienced golfers looking for a great value on a full upgrade. Complete golf sets are available for men, women, seniors, juniors and lefties, ensuring no matter your needs you can find what you're looking for. Complete golf sets all ship free and come with our guaranteed lowest prices. Shop with confidence at GolfDiscount.com
Originally, golf balls were made of a hardwood, such as beech. Beginning between the 14th and 16th centuries, more expensive golf balls were made of a leather skin stuffed with down feathers; these were called "featheries". Around the mid-1800s, a new material called gutta-percha, made from the latex of the East Asian sapodilla tree, started to be used to create more inexpensive golf balls nicknamed "gutties", which had similar flight characteristics as featheries. These then progressed to "brambles" in the later 1800s, using a raised dimple pattern and resembling bramble fruit, and then to "meshies" beginning in the early 1900s, where ball manufacturers started experimenting with latex rubber cores and wound mesh skins that created recessed patterns over the ball's surface. Recessed circular dimples were patented in 1910, but didn't become popular until the 1940s after the patents expired.
Whether you’ve outgrown your setup or you’re simply looking to increase your store of equipment, we have discount golf clubs that are perfect for you. Search our selection by name, price, or date added and be sure to check back often for new additions. It’s hard to play well if you don’t have the right tools for the job and our selection of both men’s and women’s products is ideal to make you as competitive, precise, and game-day ready as you can be at all times. Plus, our wide selection means that you’ll never be stuck searching for what you need again.

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Many golfers wear special shoes. The shoes can be spikeless or with spikes attached to the soles. The spikes can be made of metal or plastic (plastic spikes are also known as "soft spikes") designed to increase traction thus helping the player to keep his/her balance during the swing, on greens, or in wet conditions. In an attempt to minimize the severity of spike marks made on greens, many golf courses have banned metal spikes, allowing only plastic spikes during play.
With our selection of golf sets available in a variety of styles and price points, you can guarantee that you’ll find just the right fit for the entire family. Whether you’re a beginner or expert golfer, we have golf club sets to match your skill level as well, so you can confidently master your game. Each of our complete sets includes woods, irons, and a putter. Search our complete golf set selection online or visit your nearest SCHEELS location and ask one of our SCHEELS experts to help.

A tee is an object (wooden or plastic) that is pushed into or placed on the ground to rest a ball on top of for an easier shot; however, this is only allowed for the first stroke (tee shot or drive) of each hole. Conventional golf tees are basically spikes with a small cup on the head to hold the ball, and are usually made of wood or plastic. Wooden tees are generally very inexpensive and quite disposable; a player may damage or break many of these during the course of a round. Plastic tees are generally more expensive but last longer. The length of tees varies according to the club intended to be used and by personal preference; longer tees (3-3.5") allow the player to position the ball higher off the ground while remaining stable when planted, and are generally used for modern deep-faced woods. They can be planted deeper for use with other clubs but then tend to break more often. Shorter tees (1.5-2.5") are suitable for irons and are more easily inserted and less easily broken than long tees. Other designs of tee exist; the "step tee" is milled or molded with a spool-shaped upper half, and so generally provides a consistent ball height from shot to shot. The "brush tee" uses a collection of stiff bristles instead of a cup to position the ball; the design is touted by its manufacturer as providing less interference to the ball or club at impact, for a straighter, longer flight.
Casual golfers can choose from our many beginner sets, featuring a full set of clubs and all the bells and whistles you'll need to get out on the course and start learning the game. More experienced golfers looking to save some money, or perhaps looking to upgrade an older set after some time away from golf, will be best suited with one of our more premium complete sets, loaded with high-end name brand equipment from driver to wedges, all in one simple and convenient purchase.

Originally, golf balls were made of a hardwood, such as beech. Beginning between the 14th and 16th centuries, more expensive golf balls were made of a leather skin stuffed with down feathers; these were called "featheries". Around the mid-1800s, a new material called gutta-percha, made from the latex of the East Asian sapodilla tree, started to be used to create more inexpensive golf balls nicknamed "gutties", which had similar flight characteristics as featheries. These then progressed to "brambles" in the later 1800s, using a raised dimple pattern and resembling bramble fruit, and then to "meshies" beginning in the early 1900s, where ball manufacturers started experimenting with latex rubber cores and wound mesh skins that created recessed patterns over the ball's surface. Recessed circular dimples were patented in 1910, but didn't become popular until the 1940s after the patents expired.
Get ready to raise your game and lower your scores with top gear and expert services from Golf Galaxy in North Park. Shop the Dallas area's best selection of golf clubs, apparel, footwear, tech and accessories. Test the latest clubs in one of our hitting bays, or try out new putters on our huge indoor putting green. Schedule a custom club fitting with our Certified Fitters-they'll make sure your new equipment is a perfect match for your swing.
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