Golf drivers help you achieve distance and flight off the tee. You can select from standard, midsize and oversized clubheads and a variety of materials, from innovative titanium to popular aluminum. Today’s larger clubfaces have larger sweet spots and promote greater stability and power on impact. In addition, drivers come in many lofts, typically between 8 and 15 degrees for men and 10 and 15 degrees for women.
Stroke counters help a player keep track of the number of strokes he or she has made during a hole, an entire round, or both. The simplest devices are strings of beads, thumbwheels or "clickers" that a player advances by one after each stroke and provide a total for the player to write on their scorecard after each hole; newer variations have various degrees of computational power added and can keep score for multiple holes, total scores, and keep track of over/under par statistics. These more advanced counters are generally referred to as "electronic scorecards". Counters by themselves are allowed under strict rules, but some multi-functional devices incorporate additional banned features like rangefinders or wind gauges, and as such the entire device becomes illegal.
Golf drivers help you achieve distance and flight off the tee. You can select from standard, midsize and oversized clubheads and a variety of materials, from innovative titanium to popular aluminum. Today’s larger clubfaces have larger sweet spots and promote greater stability and power on impact. In addition, drivers come in many lofts, typically between 8 and 15 degrees for men and 10 and 15 degrees for women.
Golf clubs are made specifically based on the handedness of each person. Therefore, someone who shoots right-handed will not be able to use clubs designed for left-handed shooters as easily as they would be able to use a club built for their dominant hand. However, it may be possible for a golfer to change his or her stance to accommodate the desire or need to use a wedge, driver, or iron designed for their opposite hand.

Originally, golf balls were made of a hardwood, such as beech. Beginning between the 14th and 16th centuries, more expensive golf balls were made of a leather skin stuffed with down feathers; these were called "featheries". Around the mid-1800s, a new material called gutta-percha, made from the latex of the East Asian sapodilla tree, started to be used to create more inexpensive golf balls nicknamed "gutties", which had similar flight characteristics as featheries. These then progressed to "brambles" in the later 1800s, using a raised dimple pattern and resembling bramble fruit, and then to "meshies" beginning in the early 1900s, where ball manufacturers started experimenting with latex rubber cores and wound mesh skins that created recessed patterns over the ball's surface. Recessed circular dimples were patented in 1910, but didn't become popular until the 1940s after the patents expired.
Golf carts are vehicles used to transport golf bags and golfers along the golf course during a round of golf. Hand carts are designed to hold only the bag, and are used by players while walking along the course to relieve them of the weight of the bag. Carts that carry both player and bag are more common on public golf courses; most of these are powered by a battery and electric motors, though gasoline-powered carts are sometimes used by course staff, and some courses and players are beginning to explore alternatives such as bicycle-drawn carts.
Whether you’re looking to upgrade your set or help an amateur get introduced to the game, our selection of discount golf clubs is a great place to start your search for new equipment. We carry a variety of equipment at hard-to-beat prices and guarantee that our selection will help you get outfitted and back onto the green in no time at all. Read More +
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