Men who are just starting to golf should check out the 16-piece PRE Men’s golf set from Pinemeadow. In addition to a great stand bag with a kickstand and carrying straps, this set will give guys all the tools they need to start their golf games. Including a 10.5-degree titanium driver, a 3-wood and a 3-hybrid as well as irons 4 through 9, a pitching wedge and a putter, this set will allow new golfers to quickly play a whole 18 with the guys. Reviewers, who rate this set highly, repeatedly note how simple and effective these clubs are and that they are well worth the low price.


Golfers also often wear gloves that help grip the club and prevent blistering. Gloves are sold individually and normally worn only on the players' non-dominant hand, but it is not unheard-of for a player to wear gloves on both hands to reduce chafing. The increased grip and control allows for harder swings to be made with more control, increasing distance.
This men’s set includes a stand bag and deep cavity irons. All of the clubs are designed for faster swing speeds and uniflex flexibility. Senior beginners will get a driver, 5-wood, 6 through 9 irons, a sand wedge, pitching wedge, putter and a hybrid. Match this set with some high compression golf balls and you’ll be ready to play with the best seniors on the course in no time.
Ball retrievers are telescoping poles with a device at the end that scoops up and traps golf balls, and are used for reclaiming a ball from a water hazard. These are allowed under strict rules (provided of course the proper one-stroke penalty is assessed for hitting the ball into the water in the first place), but for courtesy to other players a player retrieving his ball should do so quickly, and should not spend time retrieving abandoned balls.
Ball retrievers are telescoping poles with a device at the end that scoops up and traps golf balls, and are used for reclaiming a ball from a water hazard. These are allowed under strict rules (provided of course the proper one-stroke penalty is assessed for hitting the ball into the water in the first place), but for courtesy to other players a player retrieving his ball should do so quickly, and should not spend time retrieving abandoned balls.
Golf club sets are a great and easy way to get started in the sport of golf. Most golf sets will come complete with nearly everything you need to hit the course right away. Golf club sets offer a full complement of clubs including a driver, one or more fairway woods, one or more hybrids, an iron set, and a putter. All golf sets include a golf bag to carry all those clubs, and most will also include headcovers for the woods to protect the clubheads.
Each of these golf club sets for sale comes in a different-style bag and club head, making it easier to keep track of your equipment when out on the green. Most also include a stand bag for propping up your golf club set at an angle, and some even include head covers to help ensure your golf clubs' heads stay shiny and protected from the elements when not in use. For younger golfers, explore our selection of junior clubs, and start them off right with a solid set of beginner's golf equipment. These clubs can help start a lifelong love for the game.
A player usually carries several clubs during the game (but no more than fourteen, the limit defined by the rules). There are three major types of clubs, known as woods, irons, and putters. Woods are played for long shots from the tee or fairway, and occasionally rough, while irons are for precision shots from fairways as well as from the rough. Wedges are irons used to play shorter shots. A new type of club called a hybrid combines the straight-hitting characteristics of irons with the easy-to-hit characteristics of higher-lofted woods. A hybrid is often used for long shots from difficult rough. Hybrids are also used by players who have a difficult time getting the ball airborne with long irons. Wedges are played from difficult ground such as sand or the rough and for approach shots to the green. Putters are mostly played on the green, but can also be useful when playing from bunkers or for some approach shots. Putters have minimal loft, forcing the ball to stay on the putting surface when struck. The most common clubs to find in a golfer's bag are the driver, 3-wood, numbered irons from 3 to 9 (with hybrids commonly replacing the 3 and 4 iron), pitching and sand wedges, and a putter. Players commonly also carry a 5-wood, and/or additional wedges such as a gap or lob wedge.
Golfers also often wear gloves that help grip the club and prevent blistering. Gloves are sold individually and normally worn only on the players' non-dominant hand, but it is not unheard-of for a player to wear gloves on both hands to reduce chafing. The increased grip and control allows for harder swings to be made with more control, increasing distance.

The use of carts may be restricted by local rules. Courses may institute rules such as "90 degree paths", where drivers must stay on the cart path until level with their ball, and then may turn onto the course. This typically reduces the effect that the furrows from the cart wheels will have on balls. Soft ground due to rain or recent maintenance work may require a "cart path only" driving rule to protect the turf, and a similar policy may apply in general to the areas around tee boxes and greens (and on shorter par-3 holes where fairway shots are not expected). The use of carts is banned altogether at most major PGA tournaments; players walk the course assisted by a caddy who carries equipment.
Many golfers wear special shoes. The shoes can be spikeless or with spikes attached to the soles. The spikes can be made of metal or plastic (plastic spikes are also known as "soft spikes") designed to increase traction thus helping the player to keep his/her balance during the swing, on greens, or in wet conditions. In an attempt to minimize the severity of spike marks made on greens, many golf courses have banned metal spikes, allowing only plastic spikes during play.
When on the green, the ball may be picked up to be cleaned or if it is in the way of an opponent's putting line; there are certain other circumstances in which a ball may be lifted. In these cases, the ball's position must first be marked using a ball marker; this is typically a round, flat piece of metal or plastic that is differentiable from others in use. Ball markers are often integrated into other accessories, such as divot tools, scorekeeping tools or tee holders, and in the absence of a purpose-made marker, a small coin such as a penny is acceptable.
The use of carts may be restricted by local rules. Courses may institute rules such as "90 degree paths", where drivers must stay on the cart path until level with their ball, and then may turn onto the course. This typically reduces the effect that the furrows from the cart wheels will have on balls. Soft ground due to rain or recent maintenance work may require a "cart path only" driving rule to protect the turf, and a similar policy may apply in general to the areas around tee boxes and greens (and on shorter par-3 holes where fairway shots are not expected). The use of carts is banned altogether at most major PGA tournaments; players walk the course assisted by a caddy who carries equipment.
Wilson offers a complete, standard set of clubs, which gives beginners everything they need to play golf but doesn’t require the investment of a top tier set. The Ultra set includes a driver, a 3-wood, a 4 hybrid, irons 5 through 9, a pitching wedge and a putter. This set uses steel shafts and standards grips and is designed for men shorter than 6’2”. The clubs share a stylish black, gold and silver design that will make beginners look like pros on the course in no time.
Complete golf sets are perfect for beginners looking to get started or experienced golfers looking for a great value on a full upgrade. Complete golf sets are available for men, women, seniors, juniors and lefties, ensuring no matter your needs you can find what you're looking for. Complete golf sets all ship free and come with our guaranteed lowest prices. Shop with confidence at GolfDiscount.com
Originally, golf balls were made of a hardwood, such as beech. Beginning between the 14th and 16th centuries, more expensive golf balls were made of a leather skin stuffed with down feathers; these were called "featheries". Around the mid-1800s, a new material called gutta-percha, made from the latex of the East Asian sapodilla tree, started to be used to create more inexpensive golf balls nicknamed "gutties", which had similar flight characteristics as featheries. These then progressed to "brambles" in the later 1800s, using a raised dimple pattern and resembling bramble fruit, and then to "meshies" beginning in the early 1900s, where ball manufacturers started experimenting with latex rubber cores and wound mesh skins that created recessed patterns over the ball's surface. Recessed circular dimples were patented in 1910, but didn't become popular until the 1940s after the patents expired.
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