Golf club sets are a great and easy way to get started in the sport of golf. Most golf sets will come complete with nearly everything you need to hit the course right away. Golf club sets offer a full complement of clubs including a driver, one or more fairway woods, one or more hybrids, an iron set, and a putter. All golf sets include a golf bag to carry all those clubs, and most will also include headcovers for the woods to protect the clubheads.
Golf club sets are a great and easy way to get started in the sport of golf. Most golf sets will come complete with nearly everything you need to hit the course right away. Golf club sets offer a full complement of clubs including a driver, one or more fairway woods, one or more hybrids, an iron set, and a putter. All golf sets include a golf bag to carry all those clubs, and most will also include headcovers for the woods to protect the clubheads.
When on the green, the ball may be picked up to be cleaned or if it is in the way of an opponent's putting line; there are certain other circumstances in which a ball may be lifted. In these cases, the ball's position must first be marked using a ball marker; this is typically a round, flat piece of metal or plastic that is differentiable from others in use. Ball markers are often integrated into other accessories, such as divot tools, scorekeeping tools or tee holders, and in the absence of a purpose-made marker, a small coin such as a penny is acceptable.
Golf carts are vehicles used to transport golf bags and golfers along the golf course during a round of golf. Hand carts are designed to hold only the bag, and are used by players while walking along the course to relieve them of the weight of the bag. Carts that carry both player and bag are more common on public golf courses; most of these are powered by a battery and electric motors, though gasoline-powered carts are sometimes used by course staff, and some courses and players are beginning to explore alternatives such as bicycle-drawn carts.
Rangefinders allow a golfer to measure exact distance to the hole from their current position; they are illegal according to Rule 14-3 of the rules of golf, but the USGA allows individual course clubs to institute a local rule permitting rangefinders, and they are common among recreational golfers. The typical rangefinder is an optical device that is aimed by sighting the scope on the flag and using the calibrated gauge in the optics to estimate the distance based on the flagstick's apparent height. Other rangefinders estimate range using a calibrated focus or parallax control; the user sights the target, brings it into focus, and reads the distance mark on the control. Newer laser rangefinders operate by simply sighting any target and pressing a switch to take a very precise distance reading using an invisible laser. Newer golf carts often include GPS tracking which, combined with an electronic map of the course, can serve a similar function.
Consider the Tour Edge Golf HT Max Jr set for high-end, inexpensive stylish clubs for young kids. This set includes a 350cc titanium driver, some oversized steel irons and a simple mallet-style putter. This set is simple, small and well-made. It's a great option for parents and kids to play together or practice in the backyard. Tour Edge’s set even comes with a fun, bright red golf bag. 
Golf clothing includes gloves, shoes, and other specialized golf attire. Specialized golf attire (including shirts, pants, and shorts) is designed to be nonrestrictive to a player's range of motion and to keep the player warm or cool and dry while being fashionable, although a common stereotype of amateur golfers is that of wearing clothes that have long been out of fashion (or were never fashionable to begin with), kept in the back of a drawer or closet for the rare occasions the person is able to play a round.
The traditional way to play was to walk, but the use of golf carts is very common due to a number of factors. Chief among them is the sheer length of the modern course, and the required "pace of play" instituted by many courses to prevent delays for other golfers and maintain a schedule of tee times. A typical par-72 course would "measure out" at between 6,000 and 7,000 total yards, which does not count the distance between the green of one hole and the tee of the next, nor the additional distance caused by errant shots. A player walking a 7,000-yard course might traverse up to 5 miles (8km). With a typical required pace of play of 4 hours, a player would spend 1.6 hours of that time simply walking to their next shot, leaving an average of only two minutes for all players to make each of the 72 shots for a par score (and most casual players do not score the course par). Economics is another reason why carts have become prevalent at many courses; the fee for renting a cart is less expensive than paying a caddie to carry the bags, and the private club gets the money for the cart rentals. A golf cart also enables physically handicapped people to play the game. Carts are also popular with golfers who are too lazy to walk the course.
Most golf bags have a ring to which a player can tie or clip a golf towel, used to wipe hands and clean or dry balls and club faces. Some of these towels can be quite specialized, with a carabiner or other clip to attach it to the bag with a grommet used on the towel for durability, and incorporating rougher materials in certain sections of the towel for club and ball cleaning with softer weaves elsewhere for drying. Other cleaning products abound, from motorized ball cleaners to an array of brushes for various types of clubs as well as balls and shoes.
Clubhead covers protect the clubs from striking each other and from weather and incidental damage while in the bag, make clubs more identifiable at a glance, and provide a personal touch to a player's clubs. The most common clubhead covers are for a player's driver and fairway woods, as modern designs have large hollow heads and long shafts that make them prone to damage, but covers for hybrids, putters, and even irons/wedges are also marketed.
The best beginner sets have at least one driver, two woods, one putter, one hybrid, two wedges and seven irons. When you’re looking for a beginner set, you’ll want to consider the quality of the clubs, the cost of the package and the variety of features. For example, you don’t want to buy high end used clubs for a beginner if the stiff irons and high-difficulty driver will only make the game harder for them to learn. A better approach may be to use a set of simpler, less fancy clubs to get a hang of the game and get comfortable with the motions. Check out these beginner golf club sets for options that will appeal to completely new golfers. 
Casual golfers can choose from our many beginner sets, featuring a full set of clubs and all the bells and whistles you'll need to get out on the course and start learning the game. More experienced golfers looking to save some money, or perhaps looking to upgrade an older set after some time away from golf, will be best suited with one of our more premium complete sets, loaded with high-end name brand equipment from driver to wedges, all in one simple and convenient purchase.
Positional guides encompass a wide variety of devices meant to improve a player's stance or swing. Lasers attach to the shaft of a putter and project a "putting line" onto the ground. Specialized tapes attach to the clubhead and provide clues as to how the head is hitting the ground or the ball for future correction or club adjustment. These are also illegal in tournament play, but are invaluable while practicing.
To see if ShippingPass is right for you, try a 30-day free trial. Also, with ShippingPass, there is no need to worry about commitment. If you decide you want to discontinue the service, you can cancel your subscription at any time. No matter what your shipping needs, Walmart's got you covered. Sign up for ShippingPass so you can shop more, save money and live better.

Positional guides encompass a wide variety of devices meant to improve a player's stance or swing. Lasers attach to the shaft of a putter and project a "putting line" onto the ground. Specialized tapes attach to the clubhead and provide clues as to how the head is hitting the ground or the ball for future correction or club adjustment. These are also illegal in tournament play, but are invaluable while practicing.
Clubhead covers protect the clubs from striking each other and from weather and incidental damage while in the bag, make clubs more identifiable at a glance, and provide a personal touch to a player's clubs. The most common clubhead covers are for a player's driver and fairway woods, as modern designs have large hollow heads and long shafts that make them prone to damage, but covers for hybrids, putters, and even irons/wedges are also marketed.

Big 5 Sporting Goods has competitively priced golf balls, clubs and footwear to get you ready for the green. The single clubs and complete golf sets have been designed for recreational to more advanced players. Pick up a driver for distance and speed, a putter for precision and irons for their versatility. Choose golf gear that fits your budget from some of your favorite brands including Wilson, Dunlop, TaylorMade, Callaway, Titleist and more.

The set comes with a nice, standing golf bag, a 460cc driver, two fairway woods, two hybrids, four irons, two wedges, a putter, lightweight stand bag and several headcovers. This set is comprehensive, but there are also similar 16- or 12- piece Strata sets as well, also good for beginners. Simply put: The Callaway Strata is a complete set of great clubs that will benefit any beginner.
A player usually carries several clubs during the game (but no more than fourteen, the limit defined by the rules). There are three major types of clubs, known as woods, irons, and putters. Woods are played for long shots from the tee or fairway, and occasionally rough, while irons are for precision shots from fairways as well as from the rough. Wedges are irons used to play shorter shots. A new type of club called a hybrid combines the straight-hitting characteristics of irons with the easy-to-hit characteristics of higher-lofted woods. A hybrid is often used for long shots from difficult rough. Hybrids are also used by players who have a difficult time getting the ball airborne with long irons. Wedges are played from difficult ground such as sand or the rough and for approach shots to the green. Putters are mostly played on the green, but can also be useful when playing from bunkers or for some approach shots. Putters have minimal loft, forcing the ball to stay on the putting surface when struck. The most common clubs to find in a golfer's bag are the driver, 3-wood, numbered irons from 3 to 9 (with hybrids commonly replacing the 3 and 4 iron), pitching and sand wedges, and a putter. Players commonly also carry a 5-wood, and/or additional wedges such as a gap or lob wedge.
×