Golf Gifts - Holiday Top Picks Teen Golf Clubs Top Golf Brands Best Golf Clubs 2018 Left Handed Golf Sets Callaway Golf Set Best Golf Club Sets 2018 Top Flite Golf Sets Girls' Golf Sets Cobra Golf Set Women's Left Handed Golf Sets Women's Top Flite Golf Sets Tour Edge Golf Club Complete Sets Women's Tour Edge Golf Club Complete Sets Junior Top Flite Golf Club Complete Sets Junior Callaway Golf Club Complete Sets Junior Left Hand Golf Club Complete Sets Junior Tour Edge Golf Club Complete Sets Men's Golf Club Sets

Each of these golf club sets for sale comes in a different-style bag and club head, making it easier to keep track of your equipment when out on the green. Most also include a stand bag for propping up your golf club set at an angle, and some even include head covers to help ensure your golf clubs' heads stay shiny and protected from the elements when not in use. For younger golfers, explore our selection of junior clubs, and start them off right with a solid set of beginner's golf equipment. These clubs can help start a lifelong love for the game.
Ball washers may be used to clean golf balls. Various designs exist, and many golf courses provide stand-mounted ball-washers near the tee box of each hole. Some courses even have ball and club washers on each golf cart. According to strict rules, the ball is not allowed to be cleaned between a player's tee shot and the ball's landing on the green, except to the degree necessary to inspect the ball for damage that would make it unplayable. Once the ball has landed on the green, the player may pick up and wipe off the ball to remove attached dirt or debris that would impede the ball rolling along the green, and between holes the ball may be thoroughly cleaned.
Golf clubs are made specifically based on the handedness of each person. Therefore, someone who shoots right-handed will not be able to use clubs designed for left-handed shooters as easily as they would be able to use a club built for their dominant hand. However, it may be possible for a golfer to change his or her stance to accommodate the desire or need to use a wedge, driver, or iron designed for their opposite hand.
Originally, golf balls were made of a hardwood, such as beech. Beginning between the 14th and 16th centuries, more expensive golf balls were made of a leather skin stuffed with down feathers; these were called "featheries". Around the mid-1800s, a new material called gutta-percha, made from the latex of the East Asian sapodilla tree, started to be used to create more inexpensive golf balls nicknamed "gutties", which had similar flight characteristics as featheries. These then progressed to "brambles" in the later 1800s, using a raised dimple pattern and resembling bramble fruit, and then to "meshies" beginning in the early 1900s, where ball manufacturers started experimenting with latex rubber cores and wound mesh skins that created recessed patterns over the ball's surface. Recessed circular dimples were patented in 1910, but didn't become popular until the 1940s after the patents expired.
A golfer typically transports golf clubs in a golf bag. Modern golf bags are made of nylon, canvas and/or leather, with plastic or metal reinforcement and framing, but historically bags have been made from other materials. Golf bags have several pockets designed for carrying various equipment and supplies required over the course of a round of golf. Virtually all bags are sectioned off with rigid supports at the top opening, both for rigidity and to separate clubs of various types for easier selection. More expensive bags have sleeves or pockets within the main compartment for each individual club, allowing for the desired club to be more easily removed from the bag and then returned without interference from the grips of the other clubs or internal hardware of the bag.
Most golf bags have a ring to which a player can tie or clip a golf towel, used to wipe hands and clean or dry balls and club faces. Some of these towels can be quite specialized, with a carabiner or other clip to attach it to the bag with a grommet used on the towel for durability, and incorporating rougher materials in certain sections of the towel for club and ball cleaning with softer weaves elsewhere for drying. Other cleaning products abound, from motorized ball cleaners to an array of brushes for various types of clubs as well as balls and shoes.
The best beginner sets have at least one driver, two woods, one putter, one hybrid, two wedges and seven irons. When you’re looking for a beginner set, you’ll want to consider the quality of the clubs, the cost of the package and the variety of features. For example, you don’t want to buy high end used clubs for a beginner if the stiff irons and high-difficulty driver will only make the game harder for them to learn. A better approach may be to use a set of simpler, less fancy clubs to get a hang of the game and get comfortable with the motions. Check out these beginner golf club sets for options that will appeal to completely new golfers. 
Clubhead covers protect the clubs from striking each other and from weather and incidental damage while in the bag, make clubs more identifiable at a glance, and provide a personal touch to a player's clubs. The most common clubhead covers are for a player's driver and fairway woods, as modern designs have large hollow heads and long shafts that make them prone to damage, but covers for hybrids, putters, and even irons/wedges are also marketed.
Wilson offers a complete, standard set of clubs, which gives beginners everything they need to play golf but doesn’t require the investment of a top tier set. The Ultra set includes a driver, a 3-wood, a 4 hybrid, irons 5 through 9, a pitching wedge and a putter. This set uses steel shafts and standards grips and is designed for men shorter than 6’2”. The clubs share a stylish black, gold and silver design that will make beginners look like pros on the course in no time.
Clubhead covers protect the clubs from striking each other and from weather and incidental damage while in the bag, make clubs more identifiable at a glance, and provide a personal touch to a player's clubs. The most common clubhead covers are for a player's driver and fairway woods, as modern designs have large hollow heads and long shafts that make them prone to damage, but covers for hybrids, putters, and even irons/wedges are also marketed.
Ball retrievers are telescoping poles with a device at the end that scoops up and traps golf balls, and are used for reclaiming a ball from a water hazard. These are allowed under strict rules (provided of course the proper one-stroke penalty is assessed for hitting the ball into the water in the first place), but for courtesy to other players a player retrieving his ball should do so quickly, and should not spend time retrieving abandoned balls.

Sunday bags are commonly advertised as "minimalist" carry bags; they have very light weight and flexible construction allowing the bag to be rolled up or folded for storage without clubs, and have storage pockets for the essentials of play (clubs, balls, tees) but often lack more advanced features like segregated club storage, insulated pockets for drinks, stand legs etc.

A player usually carries several clubs during the game (but no more than fourteen, the limit defined by the rules). There are three major types of clubs, known as woods, irons, and putters. Woods are played for long shots from the tee or fairway, and occasionally rough, while irons are for precision shots from fairways as well as from the rough. Wedges are irons used to play shorter shots. A new type of club called a hybrid combines the straight-hitting characteristics of irons with the easy-to-hit characteristics of higher-lofted woods. A hybrid is often used for long shots from difficult rough. Hybrids are also used by players who have a difficult time getting the ball airborne with long irons. Wedges are played from difficult ground such as sand or the rough and for approach shots to the green. Putters are mostly played on the green, but can also be useful when playing from bunkers or for some approach shots. Putters have minimal loft, forcing the ball to stay on the putting surface when struck. The most common clubs to find in a golfer's bag are the driver, 3-wood, numbered irons from 3 to 9 (with hybrids commonly replacing the 3 and 4 iron), pitching and sand wedges, and a putter. Players commonly also carry a 5-wood, and/or additional wedges such as a gap or lob wedge.
×