This men’s set includes a stand bag and deep cavity irons. All of the clubs are designed for faster swing speeds and uniflex flexibility. Senior beginners will get a driver, 5-wood, 6 through 9 irons, a sand wedge, pitching wedge, putter and a hybrid. Match this set with some high compression golf balls and you’ll be ready to play with the best seniors on the course in no time.

When on the green, the ball may be picked up to be cleaned or if it is in the way of an opponent's putting line; there are certain other circumstances in which a ball may be lifted. In these cases, the ball's position must first be marked using a ball marker; this is typically a round, flat piece of metal or plastic that is differentiable from others in use. Ball markers are often integrated into other accessories, such as divot tools, scorekeeping tools or tee holders, and in the absence of a purpose-made marker, a small coin such as a penny is acceptable.


A ball mark repair tool (also known as a pitchfork or divot tool) is used to repair a ball mark (a depression in the green where a ball has hit the ground on its approach shot). Some tees contain such a tool at the end, for pure convenience when on the green. To repair a ball mark, one pushes the tool next to the mark and pushes gently inwards from all sides, loosening the compacted turf to allow rapid regrowth of grass, and then flattens the mark with the smooth flat bottom of the putter to smooth the putting surface.
Casual golfers can choose from our many beginner sets, featuring a full set of clubs and all the bells and whistles you'll need to get out on the course and start learning the game. More experienced golfers looking to save some money, or perhaps looking to upgrade an older set after some time away from golf, will be best suited with one of our more premium complete sets, loaded with high-end name brand equipment from driver to wedges, all in one simple and convenient purchase.
In April 1998, TGW.com - The Golf Warehouse took its first order and became one of the world's first online golf stores. Based out of Wichita, Kansas, TGW began as The Golf Warehouse, a small family-operated business with only four full-time employees. The company has since grown to over 250 team members. During this growth, The Golf Warehouse has become TGW to reflect the transition from online golf store pioneer to industry leader. The name and look are updated, while maintaining the same great selection and service you trust. Now, with over 230,000 square feet of warehouse space devoted to over 40,000 golf products, TGW is the Sweetest Spot in Golf.
Originally, golf balls were made of a hardwood, such as beech. Beginning between the 14th and 16th centuries, more expensive golf balls were made of a leather skin stuffed with down feathers; these were called "featheries". Around the mid-1800s, a new material called gutta-percha, made from the latex of the East Asian sapodilla tree, started to be used to create more inexpensive golf balls nicknamed "gutties", which had similar flight characteristics as featheries. These then progressed to "brambles" in the later 1800s, using a raised dimple pattern and resembling bramble fruit, and then to "meshies" beginning in the early 1900s, where ball manufacturers started experimenting with latex rubber cores and wound mesh skins that created recessed patterns over the ball's surface. Recessed circular dimples were patented in 1910, but didn't become popular until the 1940s after the patents expired.
Wilson offers a complete, standard set of clubs, which gives beginners everything they need to play golf but doesn’t require the investment of a top tier set. The Ultra set includes a driver, a 3-wood, a 4 hybrid, irons 5 through 9, a pitching wedge and a putter. This set uses steel shafts and standards grips and is designed for men shorter than 6’2”. The clubs share a stylish black, gold and silver design that will make beginners look like pros on the course in no time.

Ball retrievers are telescoping poles with a device at the end that scoops up and traps golf balls, and are used for reclaiming a ball from a water hazard. These are allowed under strict rules (provided of course the proper one-stroke penalty is assessed for hitting the ball into the water in the first place), but for courtesy to other players a player retrieving his ball should do so quickly, and should not spend time retrieving abandoned balls.
The set is specifically geared to beginners. Although it may not have the versatility that more experienced golfers want, the Ultra set delivers a great return on investment and can last for a long time. Amazon reviewers consistently compliment the clubs on their durability in beginner's hands and how you can’t get a better full set of clubs for the price.
Sunday bags are commonly advertised as "minimalist" carry bags; they have very light weight and flexible construction allowing the bag to be rolled up or folded for storage without clubs, and have storage pockets for the essentials of play (clubs, balls, tees) but often lack more advanced features like segregated club storage, insulated pockets for drinks, stand legs etc.
Casual golfers can choose from our many beginner sets, featuring a full set of clubs and all the bells and whistles you'll need to get out on the course and start learning the game. More experienced golfers looking to save some money, or perhaps looking to upgrade an older set after some time away from golf, will be best suited with one of our more premium complete sets, loaded with high-end name brand equipment from driver to wedges, all in one simple and convenient purchase.
Originally, golf balls were made of a hardwood, such as beech. Beginning between the 14th and 16th centuries, more expensive golf balls were made of a leather skin stuffed with down feathers; these were called "featheries". Around the mid-1800s, a new material called gutta-percha, made from the latex of the East Asian sapodilla tree, started to be used to create more inexpensive golf balls nicknamed "gutties", which had similar flight characteristics as featheries. These then progressed to "brambles" in the later 1800s, using a raised dimple pattern and resembling bramble fruit, and then to "meshies" beginning in the early 1900s, where ball manufacturers started experimenting with latex rubber cores and wound mesh skins that created recessed patterns over the ball's surface. Recessed circular dimples were patented in 1910, but didn't become popular until the 1940s after the patents expired.
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