The minimum allowed diameter of a golf ball is 42.67 mm and its mass may not exceed 45.93 g. Modern golf balls have a two-, three-, or four-layer design constructed from various synthetic materials. The surface usually has a pattern of 300-450 dimples designed to improve the ball's aerodynamics by reducing the ball's drag-inducing wake and allowing spin on the ball to create lift. The method of construction and materials used greatly affect the ball's playing characteristics such as distance, trajectory, spin and feel. Harder materials, such as Surlyn, usually result in the ball's traveling longer distances, while softer covers, such as urethane, tend to generate higher spin, more "feel" and greater stopping potential. Golf balls are separated into three groups depending on their construction: two-, three-, or four-piece covers. Generally four-piece golf balls tend to be the most expensive, though price is no assurance of quality.
Alternately, the rules allow for a mound of sand to be used for the same function, also only on the first shot. Before the invention of the wooden spike tee, this was the only accepted method of lifting the ball for the initial shot. This is rarely done in modern times, as a tee is easier to place, hit from, and recover, but some courses prohibit the use of tees either for traditional reasons, or because a swing that hits the tee will drive it into or rip it out of the ground, resulting in damage to the turf of the tee-box. Tees also create litter if discarded incorrectly when broken.
Clubhead covers protect the clubs from striking each other and from weather and incidental damage while in the bag, make clubs more identifiable at a glance, and provide a personal touch to a player's clubs. The most common clubhead covers are for a player's driver and fairway woods, as modern designs have large hollow heads and long shafts that make them prone to damage, but covers for hybrids, putters, and even irons/wedges are also marketed.
Each of these golf club sets for sale comes in a different-style bag and club head, making it easier to keep track of your equipment when out on the green. Most also include a stand bag for propping up your golf club set at an angle, and some even include head covers to help ensure your golf clubs' heads stay shiny and protected from the elements when not in use. For younger golfers, explore our selection of junior clubs, and start them off right with a solid set of beginner's golf equipment. These clubs can help start a lifelong love for the game.
When deciding on a club set, consider the amount of pieces you want. If you are brand new to golf, you may want to look at set that has a 15 pieces or less. That way the game won't get too complicated. If you've been playing a while and just want to get a full set of clubs that match, then certainly go with a 16-piece set or more. Keep in mind, "pieces" do not mean clubs. "Pieces" refers to the actual number of items included—the golf bag and headcovers themselves count as "pieces".
Golfers also often wear gloves that help grip the club and prevent blistering. Gloves are sold individually and normally worn only on the players' non-dominant hand, but it is not unheard-of for a player to wear gloves on both hands to reduce chafing. The increased grip and control allows for harder swings to be made with more control, increasing distance.
In April 1998, TGW.com - The Golf Warehouse took its first order and became one of the world's first online golf stores. Based out of Wichita, Kansas, TGW began as The Golf Warehouse, a small family-operated business with only four full-time employees. The company has since grown to over 250 team members. During this growth, The Golf Warehouse has become TGW to reflect the transition from online golf store pioneer to industry leader. The name and look are updated, while maintaining the same great selection and service you trust. Now, with over 230,000 square feet of warehouse space devoted to over 40,000 golf products, TGW is the Sweetest Spot in Golf.
Rangefinders allow a golfer to measure exact distance to the hole from their current position; they are illegal according to Rule 14-3 of the rules of golf, but the USGA allows individual course clubs to institute a local rule permitting rangefinders, and they are common among recreational golfers. The typical rangefinder is an optical device that is aimed by sighting the scope on the flag and using the calibrated gauge in the optics to estimate the distance based on the flagstick's apparent height. Other rangefinders estimate range using a calibrated focus or parallax control; the user sights the target, brings it into focus, and reads the distance mark on the control. Newer laser rangefinders operate by simply sighting any target and pressing a switch to take a very precise distance reading using an invisible laser. Newer golf carts often include GPS tracking which, combined with an electronic map of the course, can serve a similar function.
A ball mark repair tool (also known as a pitchfork or divot tool) is used to repair a ball mark (a depression in the green where a ball has hit the ground on its approach shot). Some tees contain such a tool at the end, for pure convenience when on the green. To repair a ball mark, one pushes the tool next to the mark and pushes gently inwards from all sides, loosening the compacted turf to allow rapid regrowth of grass, and then flattens the mark with the smooth flat bottom of the putter to smooth the putting surface.
When on the green, the ball may be picked up to be cleaned or if it is in the way of an opponent's putting line; there are certain other circumstances in which a ball may be lifted. In these cases, the ball's position must first be marked using a ball marker; this is typically a round, flat piece of metal or plastic that is differentiable from others in use. Ball markers are often integrated into other accessories, such as divot tools, scorekeeping tools or tee holders, and in the absence of a purpose-made marker, a small coin such as a penny is acceptable.
In addition to carrying a wide selection of men’s equipment, we also carry a large number of women’s golfing gear, which means that you can fill your bag and be suited up to make the best shots of your life quickly and easily. Our selection includes the Adams Women’s Blue Driver, the Callaway Women’s ZR Hybrids, the Callaway Women’s XR Fairway Woods, the Cleveland Women’s 588 RTX CB Wedges, and much more. No matter what you need to complete your toolkit, there’s a very good chance that we have it in our selection of clearance golf clubs.
×