A tee is an object (wooden or plastic) that is pushed into or placed on the ground to rest a ball on top of for an easier shot; however, this is only allowed for the first stroke (tee shot or drive) of each hole. Conventional golf tees are basically spikes with a small cup on the head to hold the ball, and are usually made of wood or plastic. Wooden tees are generally very inexpensive and quite disposable; a player may damage or break many of these during the course of a round. Plastic tees are generally more expensive but last longer. The length of tees varies according to the club intended to be used and by personal preference; longer tees (3-3.5") allow the player to position the ball higher off the ground while remaining stable when planted, and are generally used for modern deep-faced woods. They can be planted deeper for use with other clubs but then tend to break more often. Shorter tees (1.5-2.5") are suitable for irons and are more easily inserted and less easily broken than long tees. Other designs of tee exist; the "step tee" is milled or molded with a spool-shaped upper half, and so generally provides a consistent ball height from shot to shot. The "brush tee" uses a collection of stiff bristles instead of a cup to position the ball; the design is touted by its manufacturer as providing less interference to the ball or club at impact, for a straighter, longer flight.
Customers get a 460cc driver, a 3-wood, a hybrid, irons 5 through 9 and a pitching wedge. This set does not have a putter but does include head coverings. Amazon reviewers comment on the high quality of these beginner clubs and how low the price point is. Users agree on the excellence of the Pinemeadow irons​ but disagree about how much they like the driver and woods.
Big 5 Sporting Goods has competitively priced golf balls, clubs and footwear to get you ready for the green. The single clubs and complete golf sets have been designed for recreational to more advanced players. Pick up a driver for distance and speed, a putter for precision and irons for their versatility. Choose golf gear that fits your budget from some of your favorite brands including Wilson, Dunlop, TaylorMade, Callaway, Titleist and more.
At Carl’s Golf Land, we carry a wide selection of men’s clearance golf clubs designed to help you get back into the game. Our stock includes models like the Adams Blue Driver, Adams Idea A12OS Hybrid irons, the Adams Speedline Super S Black Driver, and the Adams Tight Lies Fairway Woods, among many others. Every good player has a variety of equipment in his bag, and our selection can ensure that you have the right tool for every shot you need to make.
Spikes on most golf shoes are replaceable, being attached using one of two common methods: a thread or a twist lock. Two sizes of thread are in common use, called a "large thread" and "small thread". There are two common locking systems: Q-LOK and Tri-LOK (also called "Fast Twist"). The locking systems use a plastic thread which takes only about a half turn to lock.[1]
Consider the Tour Edge Golf HT Max Jr set for high-end, inexpensive stylish clubs for young kids. This set includes a 350cc titanium driver, some oversized steel irons and a simple mallet-style putter. This set is simple, small and well-made. It's a great option for parents and kids to play together or practice in the backyard. Tour Edge’s set even comes with a fun, bright red golf bag. 
Many golfers wear special shoes. The shoes can be spikeless or with spikes attached to the soles. The spikes can be made of metal or plastic (plastic spikes are also known as "soft spikes") designed to increase traction thus helping the player to keep his/her balance during the swing, on greens, or in wet conditions. In an attempt to minimize the severity of spike marks made on greens, many golf courses have banned metal spikes, allowing only plastic spikes during play.
Originally, golf balls were made of a hardwood, such as beech. Beginning between the 14th and 16th centuries, more expensive golf balls were made of a leather skin stuffed with down feathers; these were called "featheries". Around the mid-1800s, a new material called gutta-percha, made from the latex of the East Asian sapodilla tree, started to be used to create more inexpensive golf balls nicknamed "gutties", which had similar flight characteristics as featheries. These then progressed to "brambles" in the later 1800s, using a raised dimple pattern and resembling bramble fruit, and then to "meshies" beginning in the early 1900s, where ball manufacturers started experimenting with latex rubber cores and wound mesh skins that created recessed patterns over the ball's surface. Recessed circular dimples were patented in 1910, but didn't become popular until the 1940s after the patents expired.
Golf Galaxy is your destination for expert golf club repair. Extend the life of your clubs with essential services, everything from regripping to shaft replacement. You can also trade in your golf clubs for Golf Galaxy gift cards, or shop our large selection of gently used golf clubs from top brands-each club is cleaned, inspected and graded on condition.

eBay has everything you need, from golf bags to push/pull carts to golf clothing that will have you looking your best out on the links. In addition to finding deals on new accessories, you’ll find even better prices on used golf equipment, including clubs, tees, stand bags, umbrellas and golf balls. Find everything you need, including golf cart accessories, while shopping from the convenience of your favorite easy chair.
×